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Dallas Pay Per Click

Pay Per Click Advertising, also referred to as PPC, is an Internet advertising model used to attract visitors and drive traffic to websites. The name describes the way that advertisers pay for this kind of advertising. Whenever a user clicks-thru on an advertisement and is redirected to the link’s landing page, the advertiser pays the publisher (most often the website’s owner) for that click, or engagement. Pay Per Click Advertising finds its home through a variety of media channels, on search result pages on engines like Google and Yahoo!, embedded into blogs, on social media platforms like Facebook and even videos on applications like YouTube, Hulu and Spotify.

Pay-per-click (PPC) might seem like a simple enough concept, but it’s really much more complicated than you might realize.

Sure, PPC lives up to its name. It’s an online advertising method in which you only pay when somebody clicks on your ad.

There’s quite a bit more to it than that, though. You’ll have to familiarize yourself with bidding, keywords, landing pages, budgets, ad copy, and much more if you want to run an effective PPC campaign.

Here’s what you need to know about how PPC works.

The Nitty Gritty Of How Pay-Per-Click Works

PPC exists because digital real estate is valuable.

Look at it this way: if you want to run an ad on a billboard, you’ll have to pay for that spot. Similarly, if you want to run a TV commercial during a popular program, you’ll have to pay for that, too.

The Internet works in much the same way. Some websites offer prime digital real estate. If you want to promote your brand on those sites, you’re going to have to pay somebody.

One of the ways that sites charge for advertising is by impression count. That’s usually measured in terms of per-thousand impressions (often abbreviated CPM, which stands for “cost per thousand impressions”).

If you opt for that advertising model and run your ad on a site like BuzzFeed, you could end up getting charged a fortune even if nobody clicks on your ad. That doesn’t seem right, does it?

Enter PPC, an advertiser-friendly model that gives marketers the option to pay only if somebody clicks on their ads. That’s often the preferred choice.

Why Businesses Use PPC Maketing

Why do businesses use PPC? For the same reason that they advertise anywhere else: they view it as a great way to get the word out about what they’re offering.

PPC is just one part of a multi-pronged marketing strategy. It’s rare that a business will use online advertising as the only way to draw traffic to its website.

However, it is effective at doing just that. As a result, many brands rely on it to boost top-line sales.

There’s another reason that brands opt for PPC as well: it can land them a top spot on the search results pages.

Search engines like Google and Bing give businesses the opportunity to run an ad that appear at the very top of the results list when people search for a keyword. That’s why many brands view PPC as an SEO shortcut.

What Are the Most Popular Types of PPC?

There are countless ad networks that offer PPC. However, some are more popular than others.

At the top of the list is Google AdWords. That’s a PPC option that allows you to run an ad on private websites, in the search results, or both.

On the other side of AdWords is AdSense. That’s the program that webmasters use to run AdWords ads on their sites. They get paid when visitors click on the ads.

The Role of PPC Advertising

Most businesses can’t afford to solely rely on PPC advertising. It’s too expensive, and bid amounts inevitably climb. But pay per click can fill a few important roles:

  • Campaign- and issue-based efforts: If you have a short-term campaign for a new product, service, or special issue, pay per click can be a great way to quickly generate buzz. You can start a pay per click campaign within, at most, 24-48 hours, and you can generally change the text of your ad mid-campaign, so adjusting your message is easy. If you need to focus attention for a finite amount of time, PPC is perfect.
    How does PPC Help Digital Marketing - Limited Time Offers
  • Direct-response business: If you sell a product or offer a service that folks can purchase the moment they arrive at your web site, pay per click is a great tool. Online stores are a great example: You know that each click generated is a real potential customer, so spending money to increase the number of clicks makes sense. Staying as prominent as possible within a search result equates to immediate ROI, so you may never want to turn it off. You or your agency are simply testing and optimizing to keep those ongoing costs as low as possible day by day, and month by month.
    How does PPC Help Digital Marketing - Direct Response Advertising
  • B2B Awareness: If you offer a service in which the sales cycle is measured in weeks and months instead of minutes, PPC can help with visibility and acquiring high-quality users. You can control the ad copy a new user sees and the content a new user is exposed to for a good first impression. You’re optimizing to pay for as many of the best clicks, and the best leads, at the lowest possible cost.
    How Does PPC fit in Digital Marketing - B2B Awareness
  • Niche terms: If you are trying to generate traffic for a highly specific key phrase, PPC can often provide bargains. For example, you might not want to pay the top bid for ‘shoes’, but ‘mens running shoes red and white’ is a lot less expensive. (Think “long-tail search terms” from above.)
  • Product Listings: If you sell a catalog of products, search engines like Google and Bing offer a specific ad type called product listing ads or PLA’s. These ads highlight your products, including a product image, and have become far more prominent in search results over the past year or two. These ads can do wonders to attract potential customers who are looking for what you’re selling.
    How Does PPC Fit in Digital Marketing - Product Listing Ads
  • Remarketing: A platform like Google AdWords often allows you the ability to create audiences of users who have already visited your website. You can create and target these audiences with tailored ads, including image and video ads. If you want to get users who have visited but haven’t bought from you to come back and make a purchase, remarketing can be a cost-effective tactic to increase bottom line. If you’re not running remarketing as part of your digital marketing and PPC, chances are you’re leaving money on the table.

The overall rule of thumb? Focus, focus, focus. Organic search engine optimization is a PR-based,long-term attempt to grow your brand and image. Pay per click advertising, however, should be handled like any other form of paid advertising: proactively, and with a clear, quantifiable short- ormedium-term goal in mind. In other words: concentrate on conversions, not just clicks.

 

Why PPC is Important to Digital Marketing

Pay per click advertising can generate traffic right away. It’s simple: Spend enough, get top placement, and potential customers will see your business first. If folks are searching for the key phrases on which you bid and you’ve placed a well-written ad, you will get clicks the moment the ad is activated.

So PPC advertising is fast: With some systems, such as Google AdWords, you can generate targeted traffic within a few minutes of opening an account.

PPC advertising is also nimble: Where organic search engine marketing or other forms of advertising can lag weeks or months behind changing audience behavior, you can adjust most pay per click campaigns in hours or days. That provides unmatched ability to adjust to market conditions and changing customer interests.

PPC can also be a bargain: Sometimes, you can find keyword ‘niches’ for which the top bid is a fantastic deal. These are longer, highly specific phrases, that not everyone will have taken the time to pursue; “long-tail search terms”. In this case, PPC is a great option because you can generate highly targeted traffic to your site for a fraction of the cost of any other form of paid advertising.

So, balancing the good and the bad, where does PPC fit in? As a focused advertising tool.